The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The 17th Century: Introduction

 

17th century british literature

The earlier seventeenth century, and especially the period of the English Revolution (–60), was a time of intense ferment in all areas of life — religion, science, politics, domestic relations, culture. That ferment was reflected in the literature of the era, which also registered a heightened focus on and analysis of the self and. Learn 17th literature century british with free interactive flashcards. Choose from different sets of 17th literature century british flashcards on Quizlet. The First Half of the Seventeenth Century () by Herbert J. C. Grierson. Periods of European Literature series, vol. 7. George Edward Bateman Saintsbury, ed. Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons. See also. 17th century in poetry; German literature of the Baroque period; French literature of the 17th century.


British literature - Wikipedia


The earlier seventeenth century, and especially the period of the English Revolution —60was a time of intense ferment in all areas of life — religion, science, politics, domestic relations, culture. That ferment was reflected in the literature of the era, which also registered a heightened focus on and analysis of the self and the personal life.

However, little of this seems in evidence in the elaborate frontispiece to Michael Drayton's long "chorographical" poem on the landscape, regions, and local history of Great Britainwhich appeared in the first 17th century british literature of the reign of the Stuart king James I — The frontispiece appears to represent a peaceful, prosperous, triumphant Britain, with England, Scotland, and Wales united, patriarchy and monarchy firmly established, and the nation 17th century british literature as the great theme for lofty literary celebration.

Albion the Roman name for Britain is a young and beautiful virgin wearing as cloak a map featuring rivers, trees, mountains, churches, towns; she carries a scepter and holds a cornucopia, symbol of plenty, 17th century british literature. Ships on the horizon signify exploration, trade, and garnering the riches of the sea. In the four corners stand four conquerors whose descendants ruled over Britain: the legendary Brutus, Julius Caesar, 17th century british literature, Hengist the Saxon, and the Norman William the Conqueror, 17th century british literature, "whose line yet rules," as Drayton's introductory poem states.

Yet this frontispiece also registers some of the tensions, conflicts, and redefinitions evident in the literature of the period and explored more directly in the topics and texts in this portion of the NTO Web site.

It is Albion herself, not King James, who is seated in the center holding the emblems of sovereignty; her male conquerors stand to the side, and their smaller size and their number suggest something unstable in monarchy and patriarchy. Albion's robe with its multiplicity of regional features, as well as the "Poly" of the title, suggests forces pulling against national unity. Also, Poly-Olbion had no 17th century british literature instead of a celebration of the nation in the vein of Spenser's Faerie Queene or Poly-Olbion itself, the great seventeenth-century heroic poem, Paradise Lost, treats the Fall of Man and its tragic consequences, "all our woe.

The first topic here, "Gender, Family, Household: Seventeenth-Century Norms and Controversies," provides important religious, legal, and domestic advice texts through which to explore cultural assumptions about gender roles and the patriarchal family.

It also invites attention to how those assumptions are modified or challenged in the practices of actual families and households; in tracts on transgressive subjects cross-dressing, women speaking in church, divorce ; in women's texts asserting women's worth, talents, and rights; and especially in the 17th century british literature of the English Revolution.

The protagonists here are 17th century british literature martial heroes but a domestic couple who must, both before and after their Fall, deal with questions hotly contested in the seventeenth century but also perennial: how to build a good marital relationship; how to think about science, astronomy, and the nature of things; what constitutes tyranny, servitude, and liberty; what history teaches; how to meet the daily challenges of love, work, education, change, temptation, and deceptive rhetoric; how to reconcile free will and divine providence; and how to understand and respond to God's ways.

The third topic, "Civil Wars of Ideas: Seventeenth-Century Politics, Religion, and Culture," provides an opportunity to explore, through political and polemical treatises and striking images, 17th century british literature, some of the issues and conflicts that led to civil war and the overthrow of monarchical government — These include royal absolutism vs.

Anglicanism, church ritual and ornament vs. The climax to all this was the highly dramatic trial and execution of King Charles I Januarya cataclysmic event that sent shock waves through courts, hierarchical institutions, and traditionalists everywhere; this event is presented here through contemporary accounts and graphic images.

 

English Literature: Early 17th Century ()

 

17th century british literature

 

A comprehensive guide to English literature of the late Renaissance and Early 17th Century. Contains dozens of authors and hundreds of pages, including the biographies and works of John Donne, Francis Bacon, Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick, John Milton, and many others. Learn 17th literature century british with free interactive flashcards. Choose from different sets of 17th literature century british flashcards on Quizlet. The earlier seventeenth century, and especially the period of the English Revolution (–60), was a time of intense ferment in all areas of life — religion, science, politics, domestic relations, culture. That ferment was reflected in the literature of the era, which also registered a heightened focus on and analysis of the self and.